The IMJOVEN study is the Spanish counterpart of the VIRGO study, an NIH-sponsored investigation led by Harlan Krumholz of Yale University into the excess risk in young women with AMI.

Strategies to identify individuals with subclinical alterations indicating increased risk of cardiovascular disease have been boosted by the recent development of advanced non-invasive imaging techniques

Multicenter randomized clinical trial comparing the effect of early and delayed metoprolol initiation on infarct size and clinical events in more than 200 patients with AMI

The study examines the development of cardiovascular disease and its risk factors by monitoring factory workers at their annual medical checkups.

This project, financed by the European Union and led by Philips, aims to develop a hybrid imaging system combining positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

These projects, led by Dr. Valentín Fuster, are linked to the “HRP Initiative” and are longitudinal studies into the quantification of the progress of subclinical cardiovascular disease by ultrasound imaging.

The degree of HIV infection, type of treatment, and the development of cardiovascular disease.

This recently defined project will use imaging techniques to study animal models in order.

FOCUS will help to determine the role that the polypill can play in cardiovascular disease prevention and will enable recommendations to be established for the better use of medication in patients with ischemic heart disease

This study will study spontaneous atherosclerosis in pigs. The study is currently under review and will be carried out next year.

Non-invasive imaging techniques to examine vascular-related degenerative brain diseases in order to obtain a deeper understanding of these diseases and the factors that influence their development

Will use the pig model to explore the potential of therapeutic regeneration of endothelium to restore the blood supply to ischemic cardiac muscle through the induction and growth of new blood vessels.